2019 Ford F-150 SuperCrew Power Stroke Review – Strokin’

2019 Ford F150 Lariat FX4 front quarter

2019 Ford F-150 4x4 Lariat SuperCrew Power Stroke

3.0-liter turbodiesel V6 (250 hp @ 3250 rpm, 440 lb-ft @ 1750 rpm)

Ten-speed automatic transmission, four-wheel drive

20 city / 25 highway / 22 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

11.8 city / 9.3 highway / 10.7 combined (NRCan Rating, L/100km)

24.1 (observed mileage, MPG)

Base Price: $49,580 US / $54,449 CAD

As Tested: $70,100 US/ $78,349 CAD

Prices include $1,595 destination charge in the United States and $2,000 for freight, PDI, and A/C tax in Canada and, because of cross-border equipment differences, can’t be directly compared.

I’ve never owned a truck. Over my two-plus decades of driving, I’ve shopped for trucks new and used, but have always stopped short of stroking a check for something with a bed for various reasons big and little. Typically I needed something with more interior space, more lockable cargo space, or more comfort — but one thing always holding me back was fuel economy. Traditionally, trucks aren’t particularly efficient.

However, modern diesel engines can yield impressive economy, which is why we’re beginning to see them trickle into the half-ton range of pickups from each of the Detroit Three. Ford, long the sales leader in the segment, has given the Power Stroke treatment to this F-150, and we were curious if it improves an already impressive truck.

2019 Ford F150 Lariat FX4 profile

We have a number of our regular readers who, before reading anything else — occasionally in lieu of reading anything else — go directly to the Fast Facts information box to pass judgement upon the vehicle in question. Indeed, there are two numbers that will dilate pupils, furrow brows, and warm up keyboards across the vast sea of B&B commentariat. So, let’s address them right here.

2019 Ford F150 Lariat FX4 front

First, of course, is the sticker price. From a base price of just under fifty thousand dollars, my Lariat-trimmed turbodiesel rings the register with more than twenty thousand dollars worth of options. Let’s break down some of the big-ticket options:

  • Equipment Group 502A $7050 — Lariat trim, blind-spot monitor with trailer monitoring, remote start, B&O sound system, heated steering wheel, and second-row heated seats
  • 3.0-liter V6 Turbo Diesel $4000
  • Power Running Boards $995
  • Twin-panel moonroof $1495
  • Voice-activated navigation $795
  • Trailer tow package $995
  • FX4 off-road package $905
  • 20” six-spoke painted alloy wheels $1295
  • Technology package $1195 — 360-degree camera
  • Spray-in bedliner $595

That’s a ton of goodies atop an already pricey truck. Certainly there is some fluff in these prices for the incentives that always crop up, but my goodness. Just once I’d love to see a vehicle in the press fleet with steel wheels, vinyl floors, no satellite radio, and the good engine.

2019 Ford F150 Lariat FX4 rear

Anyhow, many of these options are lovely to have, and are arguably worth the price asked — and, as usual, I’ll sort out how I’d spec my Power Stroke F-150 at the bottom of the page. I’ve no doubt that Ford will easily move these trucks, no matter the price. I just lament that I can’t buy a stripper truck for ten grand anymore. Off my lawn, and all that.

The other big number is the as-tested fuel economy of 24.1 miles per gallon. I spent a bit of time at highway speeds, but most of my driving was my usual 35-55 mph suburban boulevard and rural two-lane, and the big truck didn’t gulp the fuel like even my minivan does. I’d love to spend more time with the Power Stroke to see what kind of real-world numbers it’d manage over several tanks, but I easily beat the 22 mpg combined estimate without even trying.

Without looking at the badges, you’d be hard pressed to know this was a diesel. It’s basically silent on the inside, with barely any clatter noticeable from the outside. I’ve spent some time with many modern direct-injected gasoline engines that sound more diesel-like than this 3.0 V6 oil-burner.

2019 Ford F150 Lariat FX4 Power Stroke badge

The 10-speed automatic feels perfectly suited to this engine, keeping the low-revving V6 in the heart of the powerband with quick, nearly imperceptible up-and-downshifts. Driving the F-150 was effortless. Other than being mindful of the sheer size (again, I normally drive a minivan) squirting into a gap in traffic or ahead of a dawdling hybrid at a merge was a breeze.

2019 Ford F150 Lariat FX4 interior

It’s telling, however, that the Max Tow package for the F-150 requires the 3.5-liter twin-turbo EcoBoost gas V6, rather than this diesel engine. As my tester was equipped — 3.31 rear gears (electronically locking), 145-inch wheelbase, 4×4 Supercrew — the truck is rated for 10,300 pounds. The same size 4×4 truck with the Max Trailer Tow package (EcoBoost, 3.55 gears) can handle 12,700 pounds. 2,400 pounds can make a difference, but if your hauling needs aren’t to Max Tow levels, diesel fuel economy tends to remain higher than gas when towing. That could make a difference in the long run.

2019 Ford F150 Lariat FX4 front seats 2019 Ford F150 Lariat FX4 rear seats

I could very easily live with this truck. The interior on this mid-grade Lariat isn’t super plush, but it’s comfortable in all the right spots. The front seats are heated and cooled — you’d be surprised at how often my bride would heat her seat while I cooled mine — with the aforementioned optional rear seat heating coddled the tweens. The ride was a touch firm from the 20-inch wheels and off-road focused FX4 package, but it wasn’t objectionable. There was no cowl shake or other untoward noise when nailing expansion joints or speed bumps at inadvisable speeds.

2019 Ford F150 Lariat FX4 dashboard

The Sync3 8.0-inch touchscreen still isn’t the most responsive infotainment system I’ve used, nor are the graphics the most attractive, but it’s intuitive and works reasonably well. Thankfully, many of the typical audio controls and nearly all of the HVAC controls can be managed with large knobs and buttons below the screen — great when wearing gloves.

2019 Ford F150 Lariat FX4 center stack

Here’s where I’m going to save a boatload of theoretical cash when I build my theoretical F-150 Power Stroke: I’m abandoning four-wheel drive. The snow is almost never so bad around here that I’d need extra driven wheels — a limited-slip differential would be all I’d need.  My imaginary truck would be a relatively stripped XLT 4×2 SuperCrew, with the 302A luxury package at $4,345 (chrome appearance package, heated power front seats, and remote start), $995 for the trailer tow package, and $725 for the XLT power equipment group (110v outlet in the dash, LED box lighting, and power-slide rear window). Add another $595 for the spray-in bedliner and $420 for the locking rear end, and I’ve a great, fuel-efficient truck for $52,085 delivered.

F150 Build And Price

A diesel engine might be what it takes to get me into a proper truck. This Power Stroke-powered F-150 takes an already great truck, and amplifies it.

2019 Ford F150 Lariat FX4 blue oval badge

2019 Ford F150 Lariat FX4 rear quarter[Images: © 2020 Chris Tonn/TTAC; build-and-price screenshot via Ford.com]

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